2013 MCADSV Annual Conference Agenda

2013 MCADSV Annual Conference Brochure

WEDNESDAY, November 6

11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m. - Registration and Decorate Your Nametag

1:45-2:30 p.m. - Welcome and Plenary Session
Colleen Coble, MCADSV Chief Executive Officer

2:45-4 p.m. - Concurrent Workshops

Serving Children and Their Caregivers: A Multidisciplinary Team Approach    
Marissa Gunther, Missouri KidsFirst                            
There is a high co-occurrence of domestic violence and child sexual abuse. Multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs) cannot effectively serve children if the needs of their primary caregivers are not simultaneously addressed. This workshop will highlight the Report from the Task Force on the Prevention of Sexual Abuse of Children and its recommendation to address the co-occurrence of domestic violence and sexual abuse. Participants will discuss the role of the DV advocate as part of the MDT response and how to build collaborative relationships with MDT members in their area.

The Importance of Spirituality for Healing
Carolyn Held and Lisa Moseley, Lydia's House                 
Spirituality is a vague term that is often understood as either separate from or synonymous with religion. Spirituality is also an essential part of the healing process for survivors of domestic violence. This workshop will explore the meaning of spirituality and what spiritual healing may look like in the lives of domestic violence survivors. Participants will be invited to attend a mock spiritual circle that will provide an example of how spirituality can play a role in the healing process.

A Community Training on LGBTQ Youth Sex Trafficking    
Randall Jenson and Amanda Antenucci, Safe Connections                           
This workshop is organized by the Coalition Against Youth Sexual Exploitation (CAYSE) and will explore the complexities surrounding the alarming-rates of homeless lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) youth and those that engage in sex work, regardless of personal choice or coercion.

A Taste of Mental Health First Aid
Rita McElhany, Department of Mental Health
This workshop gives participant a taste of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA). The goal of the MHFA program is to help the public identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. This presentation includes information about the content of a MHFA class, including exercises, video clips and an opportunity to learn what a Mental Health First Aider can do to assist an individual experiencing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

5:00-6:30 p.m. - Reception


THURSDAY, November 7

7:30-8:30 a.m. - Breakfast Buffet

8:45-10 a.m. - Keynote Session
Norma Wong, Move to End Violence

10:15-11:30 a.m. - Concurrent Workshops    

Collaborative Response to Sexual Assault in At-Risk Populations   
Rick Noble, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department
Cindy Malott, YWCA - St. Louis Regional Sexual Assault Center  
                 
Responding effectively to sexual assault requires collaboration from advocates and law enforcement. This workshop will provide practical tools for collaboration when working with victims at high risk for re-victimization, such as victims struggling with substance abuse issues, homelessness and surviving through prostitution/sexual exploitation. We will discuss effective strategies for victim-centered problem solving when working with sexual assault victims facing unique and challenging situations. We will utilize three specific case studies to demonstrate these strategies.

Eliminating Victim Intimidation    
Catherine Vannier and Katie Blaine, Missouri Office on Prosecution Services (MOPS)                    
This workshop will explore the dynamics of witness intimidation from the pre-crime preparation phase to the reporting to law enforcement and charging phases, through the trial and sentencing and beyond. The class will describe the legal significance of common witness intimidation tactics used by offenders, as well as offering advocacy suggestions for helping witnesses prepare for the possibility of and to avoid the anguish of intimidation.

Relationship Status: It's Complicated - Teens, Technology and Relationships
Kaleigh Cornelison and Lauren Keefer, Safe Connections                    
Technology and social media shape the identities and worldviews of today’s teens. Adolescent sexuality and relationships are interwoven with technology, and many caregivers and professionals are left wondering: what does it all mean? We will examine how technology shapes teen sexuality and relationships—both as a tool for positive youth development and as a potentially harmful aspect of teen dating violence.

Using Data Collection to Rekindle the Flame
Sarah Ehrhard, Missouri Association for Social Welfare (MASW)   
Martha Sander, Council on Families in Crisis  
                 
As funding and community decisions become more data driven, data collection has become increasingly more important. This presentation will provide an overview of how to improve data quality while still maintaining confidentiality. The presenters will also discuss the importance of data in telling the stories of survivors of domestic and sexual violence in your community, and the challenges in data collection and possible solutions.

12-1:45 p.m. - Luncheon and MCADSV Annual Membership Meeting

2-3:15 p.m. - Concurrent Workshops    

LGBTQ Communities Leadership Roundtable
Matthew Huffman, MCADSV                            
The purpose of this roundtable is to provide an opportunity for individuals from the LGBTQ community to have an open, honest and safe space to discuss the issue of leadership from personal, community and organizational frameworks.

Closing the Gap: Homelessness, Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
Jennifer Carter Dochler, MCADSV
Kim Kempf, YWCA St. Joseph                    

The National Center on Family Homelessness recently released its publication, Closing the Gap: Integrating Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence Experiencing Homelessness. MCADSV was highlighted in the toolkit for statewide system integration. This workshop will review the national findings and discuss implications for Missouri, including hearing from a local domestic and sexual violence program that integrates services and funding.

Finding the Forward Stance in Me/Us, Part I   
Norma Wong, Move to End Violence                            
How can I be more naturally powerful? Draw inspiration and energy not only from anger and historical trauma? See and step into opportunities and dangers? Step back to set, not in retreat? Create resonance and feel resonance? Cultivate energy? Meet change? If these questions speak to you, then consider participating in this workshop. Be prepared to be physically interactive. Assist the trainer by sharing any learning or physical challenges. Wear flat or athletic shoes or take them off.

3:45-5 p.m. - Concurrent Workshops    

Join the Team! Engaging Volunteers in Your Community   
Misty Campbell and Jessie Funk, Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA)                           
This workshop will help participants learn how to strengthen and expand the capacity of their advocacy program through more effective utilization of volunteers. Discussion will include recruitment and retention ideas, developing a culturally competent volunteer base, continuing training ideas, budget conscious appreciation activities, volunteer management skills, and engaging all staff in recruitment efforts. Presentation will provide participants with various tools and resources to take back to their communities, including developing a community specific action plan.

Domestic Violence Data Reporting Success Story: The Women's Safe House and ALICE
CJ Spencer, The Women's Safe House                            
A domestic violence advocate/trainer shares a success story about how her agency uses ALICE database/software to track and report client information from the crisis hotline throughout residential stays, outcomes and beyond. Highlights from the workshop include scenarios and screenshots from the ALICE “playground” training environment.

Finding the Forward Stance in Me/Us, Part II
Norma Wong, Move to End Violence                            
How can I be more naturally powerful? Draw inspiration and energy not only from anger and historical trauma? See and step into opportunities and dangers? Step back to set, not in retreat? Create resonance and feel resonance? Cultivate energy? Meet change? If these questions speak to you, then consider participating in this workshop. Be prepared to be physically interactive. Assist the trainer by sharing any learning or physical challenges. Wear flat or athletic shoes or take them off.

FRIDAY, November 8

7:30-8:30 a.m. - Breakfast Buffet  
                                
8:15-8:30 a.m. - Closing Session

Colleen Coble
, MCADSV Chief Executive Officer

8:45-10 a.m. - Concurrent Workshops

Domestic Violence and Natural Disasters   
Jennifer First, University of Missouri Terrorism and Disaster Center                            
As natural disasters become more common and severe, it is likely that larger numbers of individuals, families and communities will be impacted. The rates of domestic violence have been shown to dramatically increase following exposure to natural disasters. By understanding how women and domestic violence services are impacted by disasters, service agencies and providers can be better prepared to plan and respond to rising service needs in the event of a disaster.

The Perfect Victim: Documentary Screening, Part I 
Colleen Coble and Marie Montano, MCADSV                   
Participants will screen The Perfect Victim (82 minutes), which outlines the history of the Missouri Clemency Project. This project sought clemency for a group of domestic violence victims who were not allowed to introduce evidence of the violence against them by their abusers in their trials and were convicted of capital crimes committed against their abusers. Afterwards, a panel of individuals involved with the project will discuss their experiences and examine society’s understanding of domestic violence victims and the perception of who is “the perfect victim.”

Queering Violence: Conversations about IPV, Sexual Violence and Trauma in LGBTQ Communities   
Randall Jenson and Amanda Antenucci, Safe Connections                   
This interactive workshop, created by SocialScope Productions, uses multimedia clips from their “Memories of Violence” project, featuring stories from LGBTQ survivors of violence. Safe Connections’ team presents this workshop for service providers and community allies to understand the ongoing struggle on how we name violence on queer sexuality, bodies and spaces. Previously hosted by Brown’s School of Social Work at Washington University, this workshop was also awarded “outstanding student affairs program” by DePaul University in Chicago.

How to Have a Successful Collaboration with Law Enforcement: Understanding Probable Cause, Part I 
John Worden,University of Missouri-Extension, Law Enforcement Training Institute (LETI)
Jennifer Carter Dochler, MCADSV
                   
This two-part workshop explains the role and training of law enforcement to determine if probable cause (51% belief a crime occurred) exists to make an arrest. Topics covered include: constitutional law, reasonable suspicion to probable cause, fact versus hearsay, officer discretion, determining facts and evidence, and false arrests.

10:15 - 11:30 a.m. - Concurrent Workshops

Shifting Our Framework: Strategies for Creating LGBT Inclusive Organizations and Programs
Santiago Vasquez and Justin Shaw, Kansas City Anti-Violence Project (KCAVP)                   
More and more domestic and sexual violence programs are working hard to ensure their shelters and other programs are accessible to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) survivors. In this engaging and interactive workshop, participants will gain an understanding of the systemic issues and concerns plaguing the LGBT community while gaining critical skills to support LGBT victims of violence.

The Perfect Victim:  Panel Discussion, Part II
Colleen Coble and Marie Montano, MCADSV
Participants will screen The Perfect Victim (82 minutes), which outlines the history of the Missouri Clemency Project. This project sought clemency for a group of domestic violence victims who were not allowed to introduce evidence of the violence against them by their abusers in their trials and were convicted of capital crimes committed against their abusers. Afterwards, a panel of individuals involved with the project will discuss their experiences and examine society’s understanding of domestic violence victims and the perception of who is “the perfect victim.”

Trial College
Rachna Goel, Jane Doe Advocacy Center                           
Does working with lawyers drive you crazy? Do you get frustrated when evidence isn't used in court, character witnesses are not called upon, and the outcome of a case doesn't mesh with what you've been taught should happen? Learn what sexual violence cases look like from a lawyer's perspective. This workshop will cover sexual violence implications in family court, juvenile court and personal injury litigation. We will also touch upon common frustrations with the criminal system, including plea bargaining and failure to prosecute.

How to Have a Successful Collaboration with Law Enforcement: Understanding Probable Cause, Part II
John Worden,University of Missouri-Extension, Law Enforcement Training Institute (LETI)
Jennifer Carter Dochler, MCADSV

This two-part workshop explains the role and training of law enforcement to determine if probable cause (51% belief a crime occurred) exists to make an arrest. Topics covered include: constitutional law, reasonable suspicion to probable cause, fact versus hearsay, officer discretion, determining facts and evidence, and false arrests.


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Speaker Biographies

Amanda Antenucci, MSW, LCSW, is the Youth Services Manager for Safe Connections. She received her master's degree from the Smith College School for Social Work and was awarded the Joan Laird Thesis Prize for Excellence in LGBT Studies. She has more than 15 years experience working with youth in a variety of clinical contexts including school-based, inpatient, outpatient, residential and corrections.

Katie Blaine is the Statewide Victim Advocate Coordinator for the Missouri Office of Prosecution Services.  Prior to working as the Statewide Victim Advocate, Katie worked within the criminal justice system as a Probation and Parole Officer, and as a Prosecutor-based Victim Advocate for more than 8 years.

Misty Campbell, MS, is the Volunteer Coordinator at Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA). She has more than 7 years of experience working within the domestic/sexual violence field. Prior to MOCSA, she worked at a domestic and sexual violence crisis center, served as the SANE/SART Coordinator for KCSDV, and worked with victims of violence at a local prosecutor’s office. She attained her Master of Criminology from UMKC.

Jennifer Carter Dochler, MSW, has worked in the movement to end violence against women since 1997. Her experience in Texas and Missouri includes advocating with victims of domestic and sexual violence; research; community organizing and education; and program development in campus and community-based programs. She has taught Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence at the University of Missouri’s School of Social Work as an Adjunct Professor since 2008. Jennifer joined MCADSV’s staff in 2003 as a Program Development Specialist, then became the Education Coordinator in 2010. She became MCADSV’s Education and Outreach Coordinator in 2011.

Colleen Coble is the Chief Executive Officer of MCADSV, a position she has held since 1988. For 30 years, she has been an advocate for women and their children and an educator on enlightened approaches to violence intervention in communities. She has been a public policy advocate since 1989 and has guided the passage of significant legislation that benefits victims of domestic and sexual violence. Colleen is a founding member of the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) and serves as the NNEDV Public Policy Chair.

Kaleigh Cornelison
has been working in the field of ending dating violence and sexual assault for the past 6 years when she began teaching Sexual Assault Awareness on the University of Michigan’s campus. She obtained her MSW from Washington University in 2010 and has been teaching teens about healthy dating ever since. She is currently the Project HART Coordinator at Safe Connections.

Sarah Ehrhard, MSW, is a Data Specialist with the Homeless Missourians Information System Project at the Missouri Association for Social Welfare. Previously Sarah worked as an advocate for the Coalition Against Rape and Domestic Violence and True North. While completing her Master in Social Work, she interned at MCADSV, assisting in training and reviewing current research and data.

Jennifer First, MA, MSW, LMSW, is currently the Disaster Mental Health Program Manager for the Terrorism and Disaster Center (TDC) at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri. Prior to working at the TDC, Jennifer worked in two domestic violence shelters and a women's homeless shelter providing crisis care and advocacy. Jennifer has master's degrees in both Social Work and Theological Studies.

Jessie Funk, MPA, is the Coordinator of Advocacy Services at Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA). She began working at MOCSA 5 years ago as the Volunteer Coordinator and managed more than 400 volunteers in a seven-county, bi-state area. Jessie has national and international experience working in the sexual/domestic violence and human rights field. She received a Master in Public Administration from the University of Kansas.

Rachna Goel is the founder of Jane Doe Advocacy Center, a legal service center focused on sexual violence. She focuses her practice on work with adults and children at Jane Doe Advocacy Center. Her previous experience includes work with adults and children with disabilities, parents facing allegations of child abuse and neglect, adoption of children in foster care, and general family law.

Marissa Gunther, MSW, LMSW, has 7 years of experience working for programs that empower survivors of domestic and sexual violence. She is the Prevention Coordinator for Missouri KidsFirst and is responsible for overseeing all primary prevention programming, which includes community engagement and education, coalition building, Prevent Child Abuse Missouri and the Pinwheels for Prevention Campaign.

Carolyn Held is an ordained chaplain in the United Church of Christ. She holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from North Dakota State University and an M.Div. from Eden Theological Seminary. Carolyn has been the chaplain at Lydia’s House since September 2003.

Matthew Huffman joined the MCADSV staff in 2012 as a Program Development Specialist with a focus on prevention work. Matthew has experience in prevention work with middle-school to college-age students. He has also organized programs promoting healthy sexuality and relationships in the LGBTQ community. Matthew helped revive the University of Missouri–Columbia’s Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention (RSVP) Center’s work with men on campus. He gained valuable experience at True North in Columbia, first as a shelter advocate and then as a youth outreach coordinator.

Randall Jenson is the LGBTQ Youth Advocate at Safe Connections. He created the Memories of Violence multimedia project and the 50Faggots web series, documenting lives of self-identified effeminate gay men in the U.S. He has received national awards for his leadership and work with young people, homeless and at-risk youth, addressing the juvenile legal system and media's impact on queer lives.

Lauren Keefer received her BA in Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies from Washington University and has dedicated herself as a student, volunteer and professional to anti-violence work for the last 8 years. She has worked toward the primary prevention of relationship and sexual violence with Safe Connections Project HART program and as the Safe Connections on Campus Coordinator.

Kim Kempf has served as the Director of Victim Services for the YWCA St. Joseph since 2001. Under her leadership, the Victim Services Department has enhanced services in the emergency shelter and rape crisis programs and has expanded to include transitional and permanent housing programs and a sexual violence primary prevention program on the campus of Missouri Western State University. She has a Master of Arts degree in Counseling and Guidance from the University of Missouri – Kansas City and is a Licensed Professional Counselor. She has served as the chair for the Sexual Assault and Family Violence Council in St. Joseph for the past 12 years. She served on the Board of Directors for MCADSV from 2007 - 2012 and currently serves on the Membership Committee and the Quality Assurance Workgroup.

Cindy Malott is the Crisis Intervention Supervisor at the YWCA – St. Louis Regional Sexual Assault Center, supervising the hospital and police advocacy programs. She has 20 years experience providing advocacy to victims of rape, sexual assault, child sexual abuse, domestic sex trafficking and domestic violence.

Rita McElhany is the Mental Health Promotions Coordinator for the Division Behavioral Health with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. She is the program manager for Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and is a member of the national MHFA workgroup.

Marie Montano, MSW, is the Program Development Coordinator at MCADSV, a position she’s held since 2013. She began as a Program Development Specialist in 2007, and previously worked at Legal Services of Eastern Missouri’s Lasting Solutions, where she assisted with intake and crisis intervention in family law cases involving domestic violence. While completing her Master in Social Work, she interned at MCADSV and at True North in Columbia. Marie also assisted with a research project to assess student health centers’ responses to sexual assault at Missouri colleges and universities.

Lisa Moseley, BSW, MRE, has worked at Lydia's House the past 8 years. She currently serves as the Program Director. Lisa values the opportunity to work with the women and children at Lydia’s House because it brings together her great passions for ministry and social work.

Detective Rick Noble
has been a police officer with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department for 16 years. He has been a detective working with victims of sexual violence and abuse for more than 10 years in the Sex Crimes unit. His specialization is working with at-risk populations and victims with cold hit DNA cases.

Martha Sander is the executive director for Council on Families in Crisis in Nevada, Mo., providing residential and nonresidential services for survivors of domestic and sexual violence. She’s been an advocate for more than 22 years. She currently serves on the MCADSV Membership Committee and is an individual member of MCADSV.

Justin Shaw is the Executive Director for the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project (KCAVP), serving lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender victims of violence and advocating for social change. He obtained his bachelor's degree in Management and Marketing from Park University in 2005 and will begin his Master in Social Work degree in 2014.

CJ Spencer is the Residential Liaison/Primary Child Support Advocate of The Women’s Safe House in St. Louis. She is a domestic violence advocate who facilitates family education and parenting groups for the residents in the shelter and provides ongoing health/safety training and support to staff and volunteers on answering hotline crisis calls and residential (agency and outcome) reporting using the ALICE database and software.

Catherine Vannier is the Family Violence Resource Prosecutor for the Missouri Office of Prosecution Services (MOPS). Catherine received the 2012 James P. Damos Award by the Missouri Victims’ Assistance Network (MOVA) in recognition of her willingness to go above and beyond in order to effect positive change for victims. She is also a member of the Task Force on the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse.

Santiago Vasquez is the Outreach and Education Coordinator for the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project (KCAVP), specializing in addressing the unique circumstances that a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender victim of violence may experience. He obtained his Bachelor of General Studies with a concentration in Sociology in 2008 from Wichita State University.

Norma Wong is a private consultant who specializes in strategic thinking and organizational capacity. Some of her recent and current work includes: faculty, strategic thinking and program design for the Move to End Violence, a 10-year initiative sponsored by the NoVo Foundation; strategy support for the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission; strategic thinking and planning for the Movement Strategy Center; and strategic thinking and team development for Mobilize the Immigrant Vote. She is on the faculty of the Forward Stance Leadership Institute, a project of Forward Together (formerly Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice), and the Asian Pacific American Women’s Leadership Institute for the Center for Asian and Pacific American Women. Norma is also an instructor with the Institute of Zen Studies. In 2000, she was ordained as a Zen Priest of the Daihonzan Chozen-ji after being a student of the late Tenshin Tanouye Rotaishi for 20 years. She received her inka shomei (Mind Stamp) in 2005 as an 86th generation Zen Master. The Applied-Zen program offers workshops and training for those interested in the application of Zen principles and spiritual training in their work and life. In earlier years, Norma served as a Hawaii state legislator and aided in two terms of policy work in the office of Gov. John Waihee. For two decades, she did community organizing and policy work in the Native Hawaiian (indigenous) community.

John Worden, BA, MA, worked for 21 years at the Columbia Police Department (CPD). At CPD, he was a Sergeant for 11 years and from 2005-2011, he served as the Director of Training, Recruiting and Hiring. He is currently Director of the Law Enforcement Training Institute (LETI) at the University of Missouri-Extension.













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